Rocky Mountain Roasting Co., Logo Dancing Bean
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Have a Cup Of Coffee

At Rocky Mountain Roasting Co. in Bozeman, Montana, we use the one-way valve system to extend the freshness of our coffee. Enjoy the premium coffee our process produces!


Roasted Coffee Beans

Process

When roasted, coffee naturally emits carbon dioxide (CO2), which is heavier than oxygen (O2). During this process, the coffee emits more CO2 and pushes the O2 out through the one-way valve. Like any food product, the slowing or stopping of oxygenation results in longer freshness times. Our years of taste-testing conclude that the coffee will remain fresh for four to five months. Some companies claim that their coffee will remain fresh for years. Our belief is that, even with our one-valve system, it won't work these miracle claims.

Storage

It's best to store your coffee in a cool, dark place. Do not refrigerate or freeze it. Once the coffee package has been opened, transfer it to a clean, airtight container. Try not to use plastic or any container that may harbor odors. Your coffee will absorb this odor and it will be transferred into your brew. We recommend that you enjoy our coffee as quickly as possible after you open the Mylar® bag. Ground coffee will keep for up to three months if the bag remains unopened.


Is Your Coffee Burnt?

A very large conglomerate (named after a character in Herman Melville's Moby Dick) is often accused of burning the coffee they roast. We don't make a habit of defending coffee superpowers, but these beans were, in fact, never burned. They may have been intentionally roasted for the flavor to be incredibly intense. As a result, it absorbed a bold amount of the "smoky" flavor.

If this ever happens to you, we're still defending "engulf and devour". Let the same cup of coffee cool for 20 minutes and then taste it. The "burned" flavor will transform to a whole new taste experience. Again, these tastes come from the development of the coffee bean during the roast. We believe that if varied roasters processed the same beans to their specifications, different tastes would appear.